One thing I like about this whole graduate entry veterinary medicine program is that they expect that we have a lot of previous knowledge.  One thing I dislike about this whole graduate entry veterinary medicine program is that they expect that we have a lot of previous knowledge.

For evidence of the above, I present this week’s case study (in one class, and, sadly, I have six).  I mean, I’m supposed to answer these questions, and, well, I am used to trying to swallow lots of theory before I get to look at anything practical.  So I like this kind of homework.  It makes me feel all warm and fuzzy, like, maybe by the end of this LONG stint, I will be a doctor.  On the other hand, I don’t even know what ‘tachypnoic’ means!  I guess we all know one of my Saturday tasks.

History:

Two month-old Tb foal presented for coughing and exercise intolerance.

Clinical examination:

Foal bright, alert and standing and in good body condition. The foal was febrile and tachypnoic with a nostril flare and marked inspiratory and expiratory movement of the thoracic cage. Auscultation of the lungs revealed bilateral, generalised inspiratory and expiratory wheezes.

Questions (please take into consideration chapter 45):

  1. What are some differentials for the lower airway abnormality?
  2. Why is the foal tachypnoic? Why are the nostrils flared? Describe the mechanics involved with inhalation and exhalation in this case.
  3. What would be contributing towards/creating the abnormal lung sounds (i.e., what changes are occurring in the lower airway)?
  4. What diagnostics would be helpful in determining the cause of the lower airway abnormality as well as assisting in determining treatment?

~09250671

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